Can Dogs Eat Persimmons? Can Your Pup Taste The Divine Fruit


Can Dogs Eat Persimmons

Persimmons, that weird fruit that looks like a tomato but tastes like an apricot. If you are lucky enough to enjoy this fruit’s delicious flavor on a daily basis, we envy you. 

But there’s probably someone who envies you even more when you eat it – your dog. 

If your dog is used to eating fruit, like pears or kiwi, you might be thinking of feeding it with something more exotic, like persimmons. 

But the question arises: Can dogs eat persimmons?

We suggest you read our article and find everything about it. There’s probably a thing or two you haven’t thought about, and we don’t want you hurting your little friend. 


Can Dogs Eat Persimmons?

The short answer would be – YES! Dogs can eat persimmons. 

Suppose you have a couple of ripe persimmons just lying around since you’ve bought a few too many, and you’re probably sick of them. 

Giving one to your dog shouldn’t cause any major issues. 

However, we don’t recommend you make it an everyday thing. 

Dogs shouldn’t eat fruit that often. Even though they’re omnivorous, they get the majority of their nutrients from meat. 

But you might ask:

People from doghelpful.com, why can’t I share a bowl of fruit with my pooch every morning? He’s such a good boy.

Don’t worry, concerned reader. That is what we’ll cover next.


Why You Shouldn’t Feed Your Dog With Fruit Like Persimmons

Fruit contains fructose. Fructose is a type of sugar found in fruit. As we all know, sugar is bad for dogs.

On this site, we like to think you want to keep your dog in good health and to let them have sugar, of any kind, is a big no-no.

Another thing that persimmons have that can harm your dog is seeds and pits. Eating these can cause small intestines inflammation and various other digestive issues. 

You know what else has a pit, and your dog might be able to eat it?

It’s plums, find out if dogs can eat plums? 

But it’s not all bad. Persimmons are a fruit, after all. One thing we can all agree on is that fruit is healthy, and there can be a few benefits your dog might enjoy as well.

Let’s see what those are. 


Benefits Of Persimmons

Before we mention any of the numerous benefits persimmons have to offer, let’s first examine their nutritional value. 

One Persimmon (168 grams) Contains

Calories118
Carbs31 grams
Sugar21 grams
Protein1 gram
Fat0.3 grams
Fiber6 grams
Vitamin A55% of the RDI*
Vitamin C22% of the RDI
Vitamin E6% of the RDI
Vitamin K5% of the RDI
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)8% of the RDI
Potassium8% of the RDI
Copper9% of the RDI
Manganese30% of the RDI
*RDI – Recommended daily intake
  • As we can see, persimmons are packed with vitamin A. Vitamin A is great for the immune system and vision. Two persimmons a day is enough for us to achieve the daily intake of this vitamin.
  • Our dogs also benefit from vitamin A, but not to the same extent. That’s why we shouldn’t feed them persimmons every day, let alone two. 
  • Persimmons contain a lot of manganese as well. This mineral will help your pooch digest proteins, carbs, liver, and kidneys. 
  • But, if your dog already has a meat-rich diet, with plenty of organ meat, he or she will probably not need persimmons that much.
  • Finally, we have vitamin C. That has to be very important, right? After all, everybody says that vitamin C is crucial for health.
  • It’s true; vitamin C is great for our immune system. Our dogs, on the other hand, produce their own! So, unless there’s something wrong with your pup, vitamin C shouldn’t be on their menu. 
  • Finally, persimmons are rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants have no downsides. They’re useful for both our pups and us; they protect our heart and keep chronic diseases away. 
  • With all that being said. How should our dogs eat persimmons?

How To Properly Feed Your Dog Persimmons?

Dh Can Dogs Eat Persimmons

Even after reading everything above, you still decided to give your dog persimmons. How would you go about doing that?

Check What Kind Of Persimmon You Have

  • American persimmons tend to have around ten seeds. Seeds can cause stomach issues, so getting rid of these before you feed one to a dog is recommended. 
  • Cultivar “hachiya” is grown in Hawaii. It’s seedless, so there won’t be any hassle with seeds. Just make sure to ask the person you’re buying from what kind it is. 

Properly Wash The Persimmon

  • Too many people give their dogs fruit without washing it first. The fruit probably has pesticides on its surface, which can harm your dog. 
  • So don’t be lazy. If you’re giving fruit to your dog, make sure it’s something you would eat as well. 
  • But, if your dog somehow ate a persimmon he shouldn’t have, what should you do? Let’s talk about it.

My Dog Ate A Persimmon! I Don’t Know What Kind!

So, you saw your dog munching on this delicious fruit, but you also know it could harm him or her. 

The pit is probably the thing that can harm him the most.

One pit likely won’t cause that much damage. But if you have a persimmon tree nearby, and your little tail-wagger has been having an after lunch snack every day, it could harm him. 

If you see your dog struggling and showing signs of weakness and constipation, go to a vet as soon as possible.


Can Dogs Eat Persimmons – The Verdict

After a very comprehensive explanation, if I do say so myself, we’ve concluded that dogs can eat persimmons.

Although very healthy and full of vitamins, persimmons are a fruit. 

However, we’ve also said that fruits shouldn’t be a regular part of your dog’s diet. 

There might be someone out there thinking, “I give my dog fruits all the time, and she’s as happy as ever.” 

That’s great, and all, but your dog is probably genetically capable of digesting that fruit properly. Even then, you might be harming your dog in the long run without even knowing it. 

Always remember, fruit contains sugar, and sugar is bad for dogs. 

If you want to let your pup try a persimmon. Make sure there’s no pits or seeds. That the persimmon is properly washed and you should be good to go. 

No more than 1 persimmon every once in a while, though. It’s a dog, not an 11-year-old. 

Stick to organ meat, and your little fleabag will keep waking up your neighbors for a long time.

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