Can Dogs Eat Peaches?


Can Dogs Eat Peaches

Attention all pet parents who spoil their dogs!

We are all guilty of sharing an occasional piece of steak or chicken with our dogs, but what about pitted fruits, such as peaches?

Here is a short story of how a freak-out incident let me to discover that dogs will eat a peach if given to them, and may even like it. Most importantly, it may actually not be too bad for them. We just need to be extra careful.


Can Dogs Eat Peaches?

My “Dog versus Peach” story takes place on a Saturday during Labor Day weekend. Our afternoon walk ended abruptly after my dogs caught a whiff of the grilled meat cooking at our neighborhood’s community center.

They had veggie trays and a fruit basket. One of the children at the center had been petting my dog. Minutes later, this same kid is eating a ripe peach from the food table, approaches my dog, and places the peach on the ground.

Needless to say, my dog went straight to it, causing me to gasp trying to figure out how to remove that nice, juicy, orange piece of sweetness from him without getting bit.

So, What Happened?

I was able to get to the dog fast enough that he had just bit some of the flesh off the fruit. Thankfully, I was able to remove the pit out right on time, and threw away the rest of the fruit.

Aftermath

  • My dog went through a 2 minute spell of salivation. I want to think it was just his taste buds adjusting to the acidity of the peach, as well as the sweetness and juiciness. He didn’t eat too much of it, but it was enough to make him realize that he had eaten something he’s never tasted before.

Therefore, although my dog made it and did not get poisoned by the fruit, here are lessons I learned after calling the vet.

Here Was My Vet’s Takeaway:

“Peaches Are OK, Just Remove Skin And Pit”

Peaches are surprisingly easy on the stomachs of dogs. They contain a nice amount of nutrients that could actually be beneficial to your dog’s health.

You can feed your dog the flesh of the fruit, but remove the pit and, just to be on the safe side, also remove the skin.

  • The peach pit contains trace amounts of cyanide that could poison your dog. Also, it is a choking hazard. If swollen, it could lead to a digestive disaster due to the potential of blocking the intestinal flow.
  • The skin of the peach would not cause any level of poisoning, but keep in mind that the pesticides and other preservatives sprayed on the fruit may be dangerous to any consumer if the skin is not properly washed. Keep this in mind when deciding to feed your dog peaches or any other fruit.

Food Allergies Are Quite Real With Dogs

  • The process of digestion differs from one animal to another, just like it happens with humans. It is possible for pets to develop food allergies, and some of these might include fruit.
  • Like humans, sometimes animals could develop a food allergy to items they have never tried before. It is the same with foods we are familiar with, as well. All living beings, canine and human alike, get older and their bodies change. Don’t be too surprised if you and your dog start developing rejection to certain foods as time goes by, even to foods you have always eaten.

The lesson is: Be very aware of what your dog sniffs and tastes. The last thing you want is a visit to the emergency pet service, which is a drain of energy, time and money.

Chop Chop Chop

  • Another consideration is not to give your dog the peach in big pieces. Since the fruit is different in water content, level of sweetness, texture, and fiber density, dogs may not know how to eat the fruit. Harvey, my dog, salivated like crazy, and continued tasting his own tongue after trying the peach. If I had given him a large piece, chances are he would have swallowed it whole, causing even more potential danger to his digestive process.
  • Chop the peaches prior to feeding your dog each piece can be enjoyed peacefully.

No Canned Peaches

  • Veterinarians are 100% against feeding animals with products that contain too much sugar. The bodies of animals process sugar differently than humans, and sugar can cause numerous negative effects on your dog’s health. Do not give your dog canned fruit, as it is preserved in syrup and liquids that are heavy on refined sugar. Do not feed them any type of candy or dried fruit, either. Some contain an excessive amount of concentrated sugar.

When In Doubt: Go Online


Can My Dogs Eat Peaches

So, What If My Dog Eats A Pitted Fruit?

  • If your dog becomes ill, call the emergency vet immediately and watch for bodily reactions caused by the consumption of the fruit.
  • If your dog experiences diarrhea or vomiting, it is the body’s own need to get rid of the unwanted nutrients in the fruit, or the substances it contains. Wait until “it is all out.”

The best solution is prevention. Keep all fresh fruits out of the reach of your furry children. They are just as curious and get as hungry as regular kids.

Try your best not to change your dog’s diet too drastically just to include fruit in it. If you want to treat your dog to an occasional piece of fruit, particularly peaches, keep it at minimum.


Some Ideas To Introduce Your Dog To Fruit Could Include:

  • Freezing the fruit pieces – Your dog may have fun licking the iced fruit prior to chewing it. It may even help it go down more smoothly when digested.
  • Mixing it with meds- If you are adding antibiotics or other medicine to your dog’s food to disguise the flavor, consider mashing up a bit of sweet peach to entice your dog to eat it all.
  • Rewards- If your dog is in training, or learning a new behavior, a sweet, juicy piece of peach will probably help your pup complete the trick.

There has never been a better time to treat your pet with care and watching out for its safety.

As pet parents, we love to spoil our fur babies. Do your research and learn more about how fruit can be included in your dog’s diet in a healthy and safe way.

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